Kevin Sorbo: ‘God’s Not Dead’ Star Takes Stand Against Christian Persecution

VOICE OF THE PERSECUTED

kevin sorbo Kevin Sorbo plays a militantly atheist professor in God’s Not Dead , but in real life the actor is taking a hard stand against what he believes is persecution of Christians in America.

The actor says there is widespread negativity toward Christians in Hollywood, and believers in general.

Sorbo said he doesn’t think an actors religious or political beliefs should have any bearing on the work they get, but noted that since becoming a more vocal Christian he has seen his roles decline.

“There’s some much bashing going on in the media and world for people who believe in God,” said Sorbo. “I’m just not afraid of the [politically correct] crowd I’ll go right back at them.”

Kevin Sorbo added that there’s a tendency within Hollywood for people to “attack anybody who doesn’t agree their way,” but at the same time demand tolerance for their own beliefs. Read more

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I am Appalachia. by Muriel Miller Dressler.

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I am Appalachia. In my veins Runs fierce mountain pride; the hill-fed streams


Of passion; and, stranger, you don’t know me!


You’ve analyzed my every move–you still


Go away shaking your head. I remain


Enigmatic. How can you find rapport with me–


You, who never stood in the bowels of hell,


Never felt a mountain shake and open its jaws


To partake of human sacrifice?


You, who never stood on a high mountain


Watching the sun unwind its spiral rays:


Who never searched the glens for wild flowers,


Never picked mayapples or black walnuts; never ran


Wildly through the woods in pure delight,


Nor dangled your feet in a lazy creek?


You, who never danced to wild sweet notes,


Outpouring of nimble-fingered fiddlers;


Who never just “sat a spell,” on a porch,


Chewing and whittling; or hearing in pastime


The deep-throated bay of chasing hounds


And hunters shouting with joy, “He’s treed!”


You, who never once carried a coffin


To a family plot high up on a ridge


Because mountain folk know it’s best to lie


Where breezes from the hills whisper, “You’re home”;


You, who never saw from the valley that graves on a hill


Bring easement of pain to those below?


I tell you, stranger, hill folk know


What life is all about; they don’t need pills


To tranquilize the sorrow and joy of living.


I am Appalachia: and, stranger,


Though you’ve studied me, you still don’t know.